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on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow t
-organized fringe of radical birthers, the election of a black president doesn't tell us much about the structural barriers that continue to face the vast majority of black citizens. it doesn't tell us much about the narrow arena of electoral arena for black candidates. maybe you've noticed there's not one african-american in the united states senate. we're called 2008 with an open seat race. unpopular wars, a crushing -- a nation that was crashing in terms of the economy and exhausted the with the incumbent george w. bush opened the door wide for a democrat to win. throughout american history, race has been a disqualifier even if favorable, political circumstances. not in 2008. overall, american voters did not -- this is meaningful if imperfect progress. in three days, we'll learn if america's first black president will be re-elected. the conditions are very different this time around. he is the incumbent, the economy is still limping and it may be harder generally to win reelection of our previous 42 presidents. only 16 were elected to two terms. if america doesn't choose president obama again,
could get rain and snow. storm-team 4 meteorologist veronica johnson will tell us how much and when. >>> but first, decision day after months and months of campaigning. billions of dollars spent. the election is finally here. the final push that could decide the course of the country for the next four years. this is it. good afternoon, everybody. i'm jim handly. >> i'm pat lawson muse. we are on the trail with president obama and mitt romney. and we're also watching the polls in your neighborhood. we begin with news4's adam tuss in battleground virginia. he joins us live. the lines have been long today. >> reporter: here at this polling place, the line has been about two and a half to three hours long all day. right now, it is moving. that's the good news. it still stretches down the hill and then has to go into the building. waiting to be a part of history. some in the cold shade dance a jig to stay warm keeping the feet moving. once inside the door, greeted by reality again. the line here snaking around corners. twisting and turning before the finish line finally in sight. >> it h
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 p
sitting in with us, and chris hedges also with us. this is democracy now!, our six- hour special, and we welcome stations to our broadcast. the polls are closing, including in the key swing state of virginia, and both president obama and mitt romney are claiming they have enough votes to when the weight house -- the white house. polls have just closed in pennsylvania, in michigan, missouri, illinois, massachusetts, in maine and north dakota, and the latest projections showed president obama winning vt., while mitt romney has won georgia, indiana, kentucky, west virginia, and south carolina, they say. abc news is reporting joe manchin is reported to win reelection against the republican businessmen. that is what we know so far, and, yes, the networks have also called vermont for president obama. in a moment, we are going to go to vermont. they have also called the race for governor, and peter there will return it -- retain his governorship, and also, independent senator bernie sanders of vermont has won reelection. a longtime labor, racial justice, an activist and columnist, the f
. what's wrong with this country? >> reporter: sandy is on track to be the second-costliest storm in u.s. history. some estimates say it may cost $50 billion to rebuild. with more than 4.1 million customers still without power across a dozen states, temperatures are expected to dip into the mid to upper 30s over the weekend. this morning, "the wall street journal" reports fema has generators sitting in storage while families like this mother and daughter, living 17 flights up, are without power. telling our diane sawyer, their water is now running out, too. >> that's all the water we have left. >> it's almost gone. >> reporter: and the generators and use of them are a real question. so many feel there should be an all-hands-on-deck feeling for a disaster this large, when they hear about generators not being used properly or sitting idle, and they see generators like this story in the "post" these are two this morning, two giant generators sitting for the new york city marathon right in the middle of central park. now, they are not being used right now. not being plugged in but when you s
for us, it's written by us. >> three more days and we can get to work building our country. >> in two days america's got a choice to make. >> one final push and we'll be there. tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. >> it's up to you! you've got the power! campaign 2012, bob schieffer, norah o'donnell and john dicker son with analysis. anthony mason reports on exit polls. byron pitts follows congress. from cbs news election headquarters, here again is scott pelley >> pelley: good evening. it's a state-by-state battle tonight for electoral votes. the magic number, you'll hear it all night, is 270. you'll also be hearing a lot tonight about the battleground states. nine states where the election is so close they could swing either barack obama or mitt romney. those are the nine battleground states. the polls have closed in only one of them, virginia, and the race there we do not have enough information yet to make a projection in the state of virginia. bob schieffer is, this is -- you've been covering presidential elections since 1972. >> not 57 of them! (laughs) >> pelley: quite a few, bob.
ahead of us. they're right here. and we have to sit down and go to work on it now, not wait. this was the message the american people sent from all over and that is they're tired of these partisan gridlocks. they're tired of things like i have one goal, to defeat obama. that is gone. obama was reelected overwhelmingly. the american people want us to work together. republicans want us to work together. democrats want us to work together. they want to balance the -- a balanced approach to everything. especially with the huge deficit and taxes are part of that. i can remember my first president after i had been selected as the democratic leader. i was so afraid, i really was. and as i do on occasion, off the cuff, i said i know how to fight. i know how to dance. i do not dance as well as i fight but i would much rather dense hair -- any time and i still feel that way. it is better to dance than to fight. it is better to work together ho. everything does not have to be a fight. that is how it has been the last couple of years. everyone should comprehend especially my senate frie
of it are unrecognizable. the bridge this appears where it used to join the main road and the houses around it were someplace else before sandy roared through. who knows how that house and it up there? >> it that is a channel in the water. i don't know where that house came from. >> further south, the iconic boardwalk has lost both amusement years. this is what it used to look like and now. this is what the boardwalk look like before monday with a big sand dune designed to protect the town and property. sandy took care of both. the surge push the doo-doo houses and streets, piling up like snow. everywhere, there is destruction. houses piled on one another. even stilts' did not save some from said the's theory. >> right below us. i found out today, my family was lucky. the house that had been my family for more than 50 years appears to be ok. it has been in the same spot where it was supposed to be, which was our greatest concern, that it might have gotten move because it was on an older foundation. there was minor damage and the house got flooded but it could have been much, much worse. >> on sunda
brown to jail for six days. use his elected office to make personal gains or defraud the people he represented. but fox 5s political analyst mark plotkin believes that some will think the former chairman got off easily. >> i think most people don't think six days is in jail is a strong message. a few months in jail is a strong message. >> reporter: brown's attorney admits the bank fraud and campaign violations were wrong, but believes prosecutors would have never gone after brown if he was not the council chairman. >> he has received a sentence from the court and the court expects he will abide by the sentence. >> reporter: and brown shoulding released to head home in the next hour and that is what we told. brown will serve six months of home detention and wear an ankle bracelet, two years of probation and 4ity hours of community service. the judge said he wants the service to be visible to everyone. he wants it to happen on the weekdays, and he wants people ton this crime did not go unpunished. shawn? >> i'm curious d kwame brown talk at all today, go did he speak to the reporters
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
of a line? >> yeah, use whatever word you want to use, roasted, fileted, skewered. when the review starts out guy fieri, have you eaten at your new restaurant in time square? we look forward to a response. >> looking forward to what he has to say. >>> also a developing story in israel overnight. three people killed in a rocket attack after the israelis took out the top military commander of hamas in this strike on wednesday. we'll have a live report from tel aviv coming up straight ahead. >>> and one of the most popular energy drinks on the market. these five-hour energy capsules have been cited as a possible factor in 13 deaths. weeks after similar reports tied to monster drinks. we'll have more on that story. and then we'll take a turn, and i know, matt, it's only rock 'n' roll, but you like it. >>> i'm an unabashed lover of the rolling stones and they're celebrating their 50th anniversary. what do they remember as their early days as rock's original bad boys. what would they change if they could do it all again? we'll have an interview coming up. >> you're excited, you're even tweeting
we not use her last name told us her daughter-in-law bought five tickets for ten dollars, waited until late thursday morning to check the numbers. >> she goes out to the car. says i guess we'll check it. she was looking at it. and she says is that a five or a six? she said i just couldn't see. she said i think it is a six. she came by here, she was shaking so bad, shaking going to the door. >> reporter: at the place the ticket was sold, those that have known the couple since the husband was in boy scouts, say a more deserving couple could not have won. >> probably couldn't have happened to a better guy. >> reporter: the husband and wife who have already shown the ticket to missouri lottery officials have three adult children and a six-year-old, a girl they adopted from china. >> it is wild, crazy to think somebody that comes in here a regular basis possibly won powerball. >> reporter: for much of thursday, the question was do the numbers hold meaning. dearborn is but 35 miles north of kansas city, home to the royals baseball team, and those winning lottery numbers, they match roy
has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really uns
. terry is the chairman, president and chief executive officer of macy's and joins us from their famous location, 34th street here in new york. good morning. happy black friday. >> good morning. you should be here. all of the crowds seem to be here. you should be with us. >> you know me so well. i'll be there later today. let me ask you about the forecast for this black friday. i think 11,000 people were at macy's when the door opened at that location last night. >> yeah. i was here. letting them in, opening the door and it was a record crowd, no question about it. i stood at the front door at the broadway entrance between 34th and 35th street. i swear i was standing there for 18 to 20 minutes, and the line of incoming traffic never stopped. so people are definitely here, definitely shopping. there's bags in their hands so it's encouraging start to the holiday kickoff for black friday. >> it's interesting you note bags in their hands. so often we think of people as browsers who walk in and get caught in the frenzy. you're seeing people walk out with bags meaning they purchased something
. good to have you with us. it's 6:00. >> it is. well, the unemployment has bounced up again. the jobs report was just released a few minutes ago. cate caugiran down in the newsroom with the very latest on the numbers. >> reporter: frank and michelle, the numbers show that more jobs were added in october. let's take a look. the numbers show the u.s. economy added 171,000 jobs in october right now unemployment rate is now at 7.9%. that's up from september's report which put us at 7.8%. now, that was the first dip below 8 since before the president took office. in terms of voters, some experts say these numbers are unlikely to sway them. >> if you are a person that feels that the general recovery that we have had has not been as much as it should have been, then you have already made up your mind probably not to vote for the president for re- election. if you are conversely someone who feels that the president inherited the mess and it's turning around a ship slowly to fix this thing and you generally like where he is with his other programs, you have also already made up your mind. >> r
to emergency sections. some of these lines have been unusually long. let us take a look at illinois. they are nearly doubling the usual. >>pam: take a look of how close the presidential contest this. right now, it is in a statistical dead heat. 49 percent support president obama and the same support mitt romney. fazan grant lotus. >> at least 270 that would needed to win. the red states here are safely romney or cleaning romney. the blue states are safely obama, or legal,. these yellow states, and the key swing states. still too close to call. here are a couple of scenarios that would lead to a robber the victory. let's say romney takes florida victory possible. that gives him a florida and ohio. key as the amount of a 266. however, what happens if mitt romney does not get ohio? look at how difficult it is to get without getting ohio. he would still take colorado, ohio, and wisconsin. and he could possibly get wisconsin putting him at 273. interesting scenarios is coming up at six rules for the path to victory for president obama. and speaking of winning, we've a poll of our faceboo
, everybody. great to have you with us today. i'm jenna lee. jon: i'm jon scott. lots to get too today. we want to get started what is going on in the northeast. mother nature package powerful punch hitting an area still recovering from superstorm sandy d a strong nor'easter dumping freezing rain and snow on new york and new jersey. this winery mix coming at the worst possible time with hundreds of thousands of people still waiting for electricity to be restored after sandy. no power means no heat as temperatures plunge. steve centanni is live in new jersey. steve? >> reporter: hi, we're in manahawki new jersey. this is goes out the bay to long beach island. they're not letting cars out there including us because of a new emergency. not only was this beach area really hard hit by hurricane sandy with a lot of flooding and homes destroyed and a lot of people sent to shelters. now they have new flooding overnight because we had the nor'easter overnight with heavy, wet snow coming down. right on top of hurricane sandy. only nine days separating two storm emergencies. a double-whammy people ou
the police are not encouraging us to do so. in fact, keeping a close watch. as i mentioned, this town already so deeply ravaged by this storm. more than 500 million gallons of water flooded these streets, about 20,000 residents were cut off, completely stranded in their homes. the national guard had to come in and evacuate them and take them to shelters. half of those residents as i understand, still in their homes, still stranded, the mayor is still calling for help. this is one of many communities torn apart by sandy's cruel path. >> a grim new reality as the power of sandy's catastrophic punch continues to swell. >> it's beyond belief. it's really catastrophic. from as far north and south as you can go, there's houses ripped off their foundations, torn apart. >> reporter: new chilling images of neighborhoods utterly decimated, resembling war zones with homes crushed like crumbling match sticks. >> i got nothing left. memories and everything else, everything's ruined. ruined. >> reporter: the winds may be long gone, but the flooding isn't. here in hoboken, some 20,000 people trapped, many c
in line. cbs reporter randall pinkston joins us from the jersey shore with problems people are facing. >> reporter: good morning. the number of utility workers from around the country getting their power back online, mass transit coming back online, but there's so many problems, there's so many people who have lost homes, the temperatures are dropping, they don't have electricity, they don't have heat so small wonder that tempers are fraying. >>> reporter: you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. >> we've been cold some nights. >> dark and cold. >> reporter: con ed says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds
own money to get todd akin the republican nomination. if what used to be called the republican establishment was more on their toes, they would have done a lot more to make sure that akin -- it turns out long after he was nominated, it turns out he had been arrested many times, demonstrating in the abortion clinics in the 1980's -- not what you really want in terms of a candidate who was going to have broader appeal. same thing happened in 2010 nevada, when sharron was nominated to vote -- to run against harry reid. harry reid was considered to be road kill. they. and harry reid what. in dollar-denominated that -- in delaware they nominated that wiccan. there are republicans who are looking at their losing power and thinking we have got to do something different. but even among those people, there is a fear if they decide to do something different, olympia snowe, who was wildly popular in maine, do you really think if she had been nominated that she would not be elected? there would not be a race. she did not want -- she had had it with trying to adapt to this new reality that
who earn more than $250,000 a year? >> well that certainly is what the exit polls showed us. there was support for those polled for the president's position. the president has had lots of support for that position going back months and months. after the 2010 congressional elections when they won in that wave election that's still where the public was. having a public behind him has not helped the president in previous negotiations. of course, things have changed now. >> what do you think the mood is for compromise now? we've listened to speaker boehner. the president will make his case today. is there generally a mood that enough of this dysfunction, let's get things done and let's compromise, as long as we don't cross over our principles? >> yeah. i think there is a mood for compromise. the question is -- it will be interesting to watch the theater here. in 2010 during the lame duck period after the election there was -- they got some work done. and what -- for negotiation to work, both sides will probably start very far away. the question is will each
night, the american people voted for action, not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. and in that spirit, i've invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. last year, i worked with democrats and republicans to cut a trillion dollars worth of spending that we just couldn't afford. i intend to work with both parties to do more, and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen programs like medicaid and medicare for the long haul. i've put forward a detailed plan that allows us to make these investments, while reducing our deficit by $4 trillion over the next decade. i want to be clear-- i'm not wedded to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making ove
's re-election. >> we have seen an honest man who knows the facts and always gives it to us straight. >> reporter: and mr. obama teared up, whether from emotion or the cold, as he reminisced about his first improbable victory in the iowa caucuses that propelled him to the presidency and he asked voters for four more years to finish what he started. >> after all the rallies, after the millions of dollars of ads, it all comes down to you. it's out of my hands now. it's in yours. >> reporter: vice president joe biden is voting in his home state of delaware this morning. the president cast his ballot a week and a half ago here in chicago. and early voting has really been key to the obama campaign strategy. they are leading in the early vote in almost every battleground state that has early voting, but republicans typically turn out in greater numbers on election day, so the big question we'll be watching all day today is will those early obama leads hold. >> thank you. >>> john dickerson is with us. good morning. what should we be looking for as we watch these returns come in? >> i want
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)